The Collect for this coming Sunday

One word which came back into regular Church use in England with the new translation of the Missal is ‘dare’.

It has prominence in the newly translated introduction to the Lord’s Prayer:

At the Saviour’s command
and formed by divine teaching,
we dare to say:

Behind it lies the Greek word parrhesia, a biblical word, and a word that comes from Greek rhetoric.

It refers to a way of speaking that is frank and not circuitous. It means speaking with boldness. It describes a way of living and speaking that is enabled by confidence in the truth of the Gospel.

It is a way of speaking that could seem like impudence, that could seem like presumption. (For example: ‘Us / you a child of the Father?!?’)

But it can be also a simple, direct expression of faithfulness.

It requires courage – for, of course, even when we seek to speak in faith sometimes we will speak wrong!

But it is a way of speaking to which Pope Francis, regularly encourages those meeting for deliberation of the faith – not to be cautious because what they worry it might not meet with approval from the Pope.

We dare to pray to be brought to perfection by our heavenly Father.

May our hearts be free of presumption but strong in faith when we make this prayer.

Collect for 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Almighty ever-living God,
whom, taught by the Holy Spirit,
we dare to call our Father,
bring, we pray, to perfection in our hearts
the spirit of adoption as your sons and daughters,
that we may merit to enter into the inheritance
which you have promised.

Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.

Acknowledgements
~ Translation of the Collect: English translation of The Roman Missal © 2010, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved..
~ Commentary: (c) 2020, Allen Morris
~ Photograph: Coventry Cathedral (c) 2017, Allen Morris

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