Taste and See: The goodness of the Lord

 

Santa Maria degli Angeli

The response to the responsorial psalm provided for Mass on Sunday last, the 2nd Sunday of the Year, is very much about our response to the Lord. And the one put on our lips is a generous, fulsome response: ‘Here I am, Lord, I come to do your will’.

 

 

Here I am, Lord! I come to do your will.

I waited, I waited for the Lord
and he stooped down to me;
he heard my cry.
He put a new song into my mouth,
praise of our God.

Here I am, Lord! I come to do your will.

You do not ask for sacrifice and offerings,
but an open ear.
You do not ask for holocaust and victim.
Instead, here am I.

Here I am, Lord! I come to do your will.

In the scroll of the book it stands written
that I should do your will.
My God, I delight in your law
in the depth of my heart.

Here I am, Lord! I come to do your will.

Your justice I have proclaimed
in the great assembly.
My lips I have not sealed;
you know it, O Lord.

Here I am, Lord! I come to do your will.

Psalm 39:2,4,7-10

So we sang, and so, hopefully, we will – do his will.

But for the moment note again what the psalmist says in the first verse:

I waited, I waited for the Lord
and he stooped down to me;
he heard my cry.
He put a new song into my mouth,
praise of our God.

His response is response to a direct action of the Lord for him, and a humbling act of the Lord at that. ‘… He stooped down for me.’

Still in the wake of Christmas we might most easily think of that stooping down being the kenosis of Christ, the descent of God to share in our human flesh and circumstance.

However God’s humility expressed in his love and care for us creatures takes many forms. Just for the Creator to love and care at all is self-emptying, stooping enough.

Perhaps in prayer you could pause and wonder at the love God has for you. And once more given thanks for it, and – perhaps – recommit yourself in love for God.

The photograph continues the green and architectural theme of the week. This time the view is from Assisi down towards the Basilica of Santa Maria degli Angeli. (c) 2014, Allen Morris.

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